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Thread: motivation! training!

  1. #1
    smokdivrtrw Guest

    Default motivation! training!

    To All and any who my help:

    I have an 11 month old male black labrador. He is well mannered and pretty good at basic obedience. He has been well socialized with other humans and dogs. He is proficient in basic commands at come, sit , stay and heal, however his lack of motivation to retrieve is his shortcoming. He is good at water retrieval for the most part but delivery to hand needs work and sometimes he is slow coming back on land and wants to break and run as if he wants you to chase after him. He is very athletic but sometimes exibits some laziness. I am confident in his ability but i think there may be a dominanve issue at hand, he has a combination of kennel time and stays in the house at night. I am a firefighter and am gone for 24 hrs at a time so i don't get to work him everyday and with the heat here in mississippi at all time highs i dont get to train formally alot. Drake hasnt been force fetched or trained on an e-collar yet. my question is this dog still trainable and is the need for force training and e-collar training a must? Can anyone help me with a routine that will motivate him and get me on the right track.

    Randy Wright

    Corinth, MS

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Near Peoria IL (Dunlap)
    Posts
    576

    Default

    Randy,

    You should post this to the general discussion for more help.

    Sometimes dogs can be bored with too many retrieves. This shows up in more than a few dogs and while some will go after and retrieve a thrown object for hours, or all day long, others will be bored after one or two. I'd start by limiting the marked retrieves to a few each week. If you can get a couple good retrieves every third day or so, that's better than a sloppy work that can form bad habits. When Drake knows that his only fun time is those few retrieves, he'll be more inclined to make the most of it.

    If he's just slow coming back it could be he does not want to give up the dummy. That's what it sounds like when you say he sometimes wants to break and run. In water he has less choice and that could be why he shows less of this in water. It's hard to tell from your description. Can you sit Drake and have him stay and then when he's calm call him to you for a treat? If so, does he run right in and then sit for his reward? If you have that pattern established it's easier to have him run back with an object in his mouth. Build on one success that has elements you want to see in the final product.

    If you're throwing him dozens of marks each day you train that's too many. Hot weather is another factor and he's not going to be too lively when it 90+ degrees outside. A short session when it's cool is best. Let the retrieve be a reward and use something he likes like a tennis ball. Less is more and short thrown bouncing ball is more fun than a 40 yard dummy. Let him tell you what he likes to do and then build on that.

    Another factor could be what he's doing when not training. If it's fun time in and around the house and then you come home to train (which is less fun) you don't have a lazy dog, but a tired dog. If he get's 15 min every other day to train with you (which is enough), then the other time needs to be less fun so he's eager to do what you want.

    E-collar/force fetch, your choice, but may not be necessary. Before going all the way with force fetch, you could just do condition hold drills, this will help with the sloppy mouth habits and is good basic obedience. Find a good training resource to help with this drill.

    Good Luck, and oh yea, it's way too soon to give up as Drake is most likely very trainable. In general slow way down and don't advance past what is the current level of success. You say he is proficient at obedience, but at what level. If you can have him do all the basics off the lead in high distractive situations, then you're proficient. Strive for everything to be perfect within the length of a 6ft leash. When you have that, then itís time to move to then next level.
    Bob

    "Properly trained, a man can be dog's best friend. "
    -- Corey Ford

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    3

    Default Gone 24 hrs ,

    Randy , my lab stayed at home while I worked 72 hr shifts as a firefighter . She was fed with a feeder , automatic waterer and could cool off with a doggie door . She was the best duck retriever ever . She died at 15 yrs . Now Im retired and home all day . My new lab wont retrieve nearly as good . She has all the enthusiasm but just sniffs the duck and come back emty mouthed . go figure ?
    Quote Originally Posted by WDSprings View Post
    Randy,

    You should post this to the general discussion for more help.

    Sometimes dogs can be bored with too many retrieves. This shows up in more than a few dogs and while some will go after and retrieve a thrown object for hours, or all day long, others will be bored after one or two. I'd start by limiting the marked retrieves to a few each week. If you can get a couple good retrieves every third day or so, that's better than a sloppy work that can form bad habits. When Drake knows that his only fun time is those few retrieves, he'll be more inclined to make the most of it.

    If he's just slow coming back it could be he does not want to give up the dummy. That's what it sounds like when you say he sometimes wants to break and run. In water he has less choice and that could be why he shows less of this in water. It's hard to tell from your description. Can you sit Drake and have him stay and then when he's calm call him to you for a treat? If so, does he run right in and then sit for his reward? If you have that pattern established it's easier to have him run back with an object in his mouth. Build on one success that has elements you want to see in the final product.

    If you're throwing him dozens of marks each day you train that's too many. Hot weather is another factor and he's not going to be too lively when it 90+ degrees outside. A short session when it's cool is best. Let the retrieve be a reward and use something he likes like a tennis ball. Less is more and short thrown bouncing ball is more fun than a 40 yard dummy. Let him tell you what he likes to do and then build on that.

    Another factor could be what he's doing when not training. If it's fun time in and around the house and then you come home to train (which is less fun) you don't have a lazy dog, but a tired dog. If he get's 15 min every other day to train with you (which is enough), then the other time needs to be less fun so he's eager to do what you want.

    E-collar/force fetch, your choice, but may not be necessary. Before going all the way with force fetch, you could just do condition hold drills, this will help with the sloppy mouth habits and is good basic obedience. Find a good training resource to help with this drill.

    Good Luck, and oh yea, it's way too soon to give up as Drake is most likely very trainable. In general slow way down and don't advance past what is the current level of success. You say he is proficient at obedience, but at what level. If you can have him do all the basics off the lead in high distractive situations, then you're proficient. Strive for everything to be perfect within the length of a 6ft leash. When you have that, then itís time to move to then next level.

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