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Thread: dog food

  1. #1
    oldjohnnybrown Guest

    Default dog food

    My young Black male Lab was off his feed the day before yesterday. He is usually an eager eater. I took him to the vet but we found nothing out of the ordinary. I've been thinking it might be the feed. I recently switched from Old Roy to Purena. But since the discovery of plastic additives introduced into meat protein from China, I have almost developed a phobia about using commercial pet food.

    I may go back to chicken legs and thighs. They are cheap and I'm pretty sure they are pure chicken. Besides, I can also feed them to my family.

    Has anybody heard any news or ideas on commercial pet food safety recently?

    Thanks, John

  2. #2
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    John,
    I would go with some chicken legs and thighs and dog food. During the times that I have had just a few dogs, I have fed raw chicken legs at night and dog food in the morning (for balance). I think the dogs did better and hunted harder on that diet, and the chicken is a lot cheaper than dog food. As you and I have said in the past, make sure the chicken is raw
    so that the bones don't splinter. As we have discussed before, several thousand years of evolution are proof that raw small game bones do not carry a signifcant health cost or there would not be any dogs left around.

    Thanks for the post
    Robert

  3. #3
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    Default You get what you pay for!

    The melamine came from China in rice gluten which is the protein rich portion of rice. It was added to trick the test that measures the protien content of the product. Dog foods come in a wide range of qualities. In my opinion Old Roy and Purina Dog Chow are at the lower end of the scale.
    As with most things we buy, you get what you pay for. Try to avoid foods with ingedients like: meat and bone meal (what kind of meat?), chicken by-product or poultry by-product meal, grain fractions (like corn bran, wheat middlings, corn gluten meal, etc.), or left-overs from other products like brewers rice. Instead look for chicken meal or lamb meal or turkey meal or a type of fish meal like (salmon or herring), and whole grains like whole grain brown rice, whole grain corn, or oatmeal.
    Remeber that the ingredients are listed in order of weight so the closer to the top of the list they are the more there is in the bag. Also keep in mind that "fresh" chicken is about 70-80% water. It may be first on the list, but it may fall to 4th or 5th on the list once the water is cooked out in processing. One very well know brand touts "Real Chicken" is the number one ingredient, but once the water is gone and you add the three different types of corn on the list together it is certain that corn is the number one ingredient.
    I find that I must spend $.75 to $.85 per pound to get a food that meets my standards, but you feed less, clean-up is easier, the dogs have more enrgy and are healthier. I think quality food is a bargin!
    Last edited by Swack; 05-10-2008 at 07:29 PM.

  4. #4
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    I can't believe that I didn't get a rise out of you folks! The recommendations I suggested must have eliminated nearly 90% of the dog food on the market. Do you have any ideas about what you like to see in dog foods. Is dog nutrition important to you or do you just feed what ever is on sale? Let us know what you think!!

  5. #5
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    Default

    Swack,
    No rise out of me. I feed Eukanuba. I started it about 3 months ago and was amazed at the improvement in the dogs. I have fed a lot of different foods over the years, but Eukanuba has them all beat.

  6. #6
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    Default I Should Get A Rise Out Of You!

    Robert,
    Maybe you should reread what I said about my dog food recommendations and check the label on your bag of Eukanuba. Chicken is the number one ingredient and is 70-80% water. It will slide down the list to third or fourth once the water is reduced in processing. Corn meal is number two (number one after chicken slides down the list). It has been processed once from corn into corn meal and then processed again in the dog food manufacturing process. How much of the "whole grain" nutrition is left after going through two manufacturing processes? The following two ingredients are good; ground whole grain sorghum and ground whole grain barley. Next comes chicken by-product meal. That can be any part of the chicken that is left over during the processing of chicken for human consumption, including heads and beaks, feet and feathers, guts and their contents (including feces), etc. While I concede that there is nutritive value to many of these parts, it is a by-product that is probably treated as a by-product. The care and concern for freshness and handling is given to the PRODUCT at the poultry processing plant. The leftovers are treated with less regard.

    I would prefer my dog food contain the main course (Chicken Meal) made with the care and concern for quality that it deserves. It should be first or second on the ingredient list (second only if chicken is number one). The grains should be whole grain as much as possible.

    There is a wide range of quality in dog food from poor, to fair, to good, to better, to best. I will grant you that Eukanuba is above many in quality. It probably falls in the "good" category above. I have decided to feed the highest quality dog food that I can afford. The "Best" category can run as much as $2.00 per pound or more (check out Inova Evo, Buffalo and Salmon for example). I have found that I can get dog food that falls in the "Better" quality group for $.75 to a little over $1.00 per pound.

    Bottomline is that what you feed your dog should be based on a knowledge of canine nutrition, your dog's individual needs and tolerances, and your financial situation. If you do the best you can do nutritionally for your dog he will be able to give you his best in the field. He should also live a longer, happier, healthier life. Isn't that worth a few extra bucks for a bag of better dog food?

  7. #7
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    Just my .02. I feed Eukanuba. For the past 13.5 years. My dog is older now but I have never had a problem with her and food. She would go off her food during heat now and then. I hunted her hard in South Dakota in her prime and she was able to last full days with some extra food and treats. I also guided her at a local hunt culb a few days a week and had no problems. Her teeth have never needed cleaning do to the food. Her coat is also in great shape. I some times think we think to much. If you find something that works for you then stick with it. By the way. Hi. This is my first post on this forum. I know it just started but I hope it will turn out to be aa great learning site.

  8. #8
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    Brian,
    Welcome! I agree that you can't argue with success. As to thinking too much, I enjoy (and probably need) the mental exercise. I'm not trying to get everyone to change their brand of dog food. I just believe that canine nutrition is very important and often taken for granted. I want people to think about what they are feeding their dog and to do some research if they think they can do better. Afterall, this thread began with a discussion of Ol' Roy.

  9. #9
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    Swack,
    When I first tried Eukanuba, I did notice that corn was #3 on the ingredient list. I did not like that. However, my test was to feed the 4 skinniest dogs in the kennel on Eukanuba for a month. It made a tremendous difference. They put on weight and got sleek coats. That was enough evidence for me. I had been feeding another premium food which shall remain anonymous. I do feed a large number of dogs, so cost is definitely an issue.

    Robert

  10. #10
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    Swack,
    I agree 100% with you. You should know what is in your dog food. When I first got my dog I looked at the food and talk to my vet. I also ask questions to anyone that had a dog. Some did not know what was in the food and other did. For the most part the people that trained or hunted their dogs gave the better food on the market and knew about feeding their dogs.

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